Course Offerings

Fall 2017 Course Offerings 
SOCI #
Title
Instructor
Days/Times
Building/Room
001-01
Introduction to Sociology
Stiles TR 2:00 - 3:15 PM WGR 208
001-02
 Introduction to Sociology
Kato MW 11:00 - 12:15 PM WAL 497
001-03
Intro Soci: Community/Alienation
Hall WF 8:00 - 9:15 AM ICC 108
001-04
Introduction to Sociology
Kato MW 12:30 - 1:45 PM
WAL 390
001-05
Introduction to Sociology
Wickham-Crowley
TR 11:00 - 12:15 PM
WAL 394
001-06
Introduction to Sociology
Guidroz
TR 12:30 - 1:45 PM
WAL 497

001-07

Introduction to Sociology

Lubreski
MW 3:30 - 4:45 PM  
CBN 202
001-08

Introduction to Sociology

Andac-Jones
TR 3:30 - 4:45 PM
WAL 398
111-01
Flourishing: College & Community Stiles & Day
MW 10:00 - 10:50 AM
F 1:00 - 1:50 PM
HEAL 103
WGR 407
111-02

Flourishing: College & Community

Stiles & Day
MW 10:00 - 10:50 AM
F 3:00 - 3:50 PM

HEAL 103

WGR 411

125-01
Death and Dying Daddio
MW 3:30 - 4:45 PM
ICC 115
126-01
Society & Cultre:

Beyoncé

Dyson
MW 10:00 - 10:50 AM
F 9:00 - 9:50 AM

ICC 115 

WAL 390

126-02

Society & Cultre: Beyoncé

Dyson
MW 10:00 - 10:50 AM
F 10:00 - 10:50 AM

ICC 115

WAL 390

126-03
Society & Cultre: Beyoncé
Dyson
MW 10:00 - 11:50 AM
F 11:00 - 11:50 AM

ICC 115

WAL 392

126-04 

Society & Cultre: Beyoncé

Dyson
MW 10:00 - 10:50 AM
F 12:00 - 12:50 PM

ICC 115

WAL 392

131-01
Population Dynamics
DeRose
TR 12:30 - 1:45 PM
WAL 499
132-01
Immigrants and New Societies
Cantor
R 6:30 - 9:00 PM
WAL 392
136-01
Religion & Society Casanova
MW 11:00 - 12:15 PM
WAL 492
141-01
Social Innovation Cookson MW 8:00 - 9:15 AM WAL 290
150-01 
Social Intell in Everyday Life  Hall WF 9:30 - 10:45 AM

CBN 303

155-01
Social Movements Andac-Jones TR 5:00 - 6:15 PM WAL 499
157-01
Global Power Elites
Cookson
MW 9:30 - 10:45 AM

WAL 390

161-01
Sociology of Gender Guidroz
MW 9:30 - 10:45 AM

WAL 392

161-02
Sociology of Gender Guidroz MW 12:30 - 1:45 PM

CBN 205

168-01 

CBL: Social Entrepreneurship/Change 

Stiles
TR 3:30 - 4:45 PM
W 2:00 - 4:30 PM

ICC 102

WAL 396

190-01
Black Writers on White Identity Dyson
M 2:00 - 4:30 PM

WGR 409

195-01
Sociology of Terrorism
Daddio MW 5:00 - 6:15 PM ICC 115
201-01 Methods of Social Research Hinkson TR 11:00 - 12:15 PM CBN 390
202-01
Sociological Theory Hsu MW 12:30 - 1:45 PM CBN 309
203--01
Social Statistics  McDonald
TR 9:30 - 10:45 AM

CBN 202

220-01
Global Development & Social Justice
Hsu
MW 3:30 - 4:45 PM
WAL 497
223-01
Public Housing: Theory/Practice
McCabe
M 6:30 - 9:00 PM
WAL 394
224-01
Family Diversity in America Reid
W 6:30 - 9:00 PM

CBN 205

226-01
Consumerism/ East Asian Societies
McNamara
MW 9:30 - 10:45 AM
WAL 490
240-01
Poverty/Inequality in America
Owens
T 6:30 - 9:00 PM
ICC 120
249-01
Family & Gender in Japan
Imamura
W 3:30 - 6:00 PM
WAL 494
257-01
Brazilian Society
Wickham-Crowley
TR 2:00 - 3:15 PM
WAL 498
274-01
Environ/Food Justice Movements
Kato
R 12:30 - 3:00 PM
WGR 203

 

SOCI 001-01: Introduction to Sociology

Professor Stiles
TR 2:00 - 3:15 PM

In this course students learn how the discipline of sociology came about and how the major theories have evolved. Students will develop their “sociological imaginations,” by practicing making the familiar strange. Major topics include culture, race, gender, class, and socialization. Data workshops allow the students to take their new knowledge and “do” some sociology. There will be 2 quizzes and a cumulative final.

SOCI 001-02: Introduction to Sociology

Professor Kato
MW 11:00 - 12:15 PM

This course introduces you to the discipline of sociology and a sociological perspective for understanding human behaviors and social structure. We will discuss a great variety of topics, such as social class, gender, race and ethnicity, culture, housing, family, and community. While topics are quite diverse, we will be consistent in applying a sociological perspective and attempt to understand how individual lives and social groups are shaped by social structures, cultural understandings and distributions of power. Rather than textbooks, this course will use three books as focal points of discussion (Outliers, Unequal Childhoods, and Evicted). In order to exercise our sociological imagination, the course assignments challenge the students to dissect the current events from sociological perspectives.

SOCI 001-03: Intro Soci: Community/Alientation

Professor Hall
WF 8:00 - 9:15 AM

Course Objectives
This course addresses the following goals and questions:
1) Students will be guided to connect all the substantive topics studied in this class to their own lived experiences and observations.
2) We will put the wide range of substantive topics covered in in sociological contexts, in order to understand them more fully. For example, what does it mean to think sociologically about history in times of rapid social change?
3) How do we use sociological theories to move from describing social facts in societies to explaining them?
4) We consider many varied sources of data about contrasts and contradictions in societies, in order to deepen our understanding of social conflicts and social justice concerns.
5) What are the implications of sociological research findings for individual and collective actions re: different qualities of social experiences, social policy proposals, solving social problems, dealing with controversial social issues, etc.
6) How do major social influences affect people at different levels of sociological analysis: personal, family, community, social class, gender, racial/ethnic group, societal, and global?
7) Which particular sociological theories give us the most viable explanations of social issues?
8) How do different research methods affect our interpretations of social facts?
9) How do we benefit from learning about major social influence in and among societies?
10) How can we be agents of constructive social changes in societies?

Scope of Course
This Introduction to Sociology course examines basic sociological concepts, theories, and methodologies by focusing on the substantive topics of community and alienation. We look at how different kinds of social change, social structures, social institutions, and interaction affect opportunities, social conditions, and relationships in groups and in society at large.
Specific indicators of community and alienation are defined and applied in class discussion and research projects. Although most data are based on U.S. experiences, some comparative data from varied cultural and historical settings will also be used. Attention will be focused on how the living conditions of all members of society can be improved.
Hierarchical authority structures and rigid divisions of labor in communities may increase alienation, and alienation may create new communities. Strategies to intervene effectively in disadvantaged communities--in order to ameliorate problematic social conditions--will be discussed and designed.
Small group projects (see detailed description below) may include field work in Washington D.C. Local community organizations are possible sites or topics for research on particular aspects of community or alienation, as well as more traditional library projects. Life history data may also be used to show how individuals are integrated in or alienated from specific social groups and mainstream society.

Required Readings
Andersen, Margaret L. and Howard F. Taylor. 2015. Sociology: The Essentials (8th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
Students also build their own bibliographies to inform their group projects. These include at least six well-read sociological monographs/books or sociological research articles per group.

SOCI 001 04: Introduction to Sociology

Professor Kato
MW 12:30 - 1:45 PM

This course introduces you to the discipline of sociology and a sociological perspective for understanding human behaviors and social structure. We will discuss a great variety of topics, such as social class, gender, race and ethnicity, culture, housing, family, and community. While topics are quite diverse, we will be consistent in applying a sociological perspective and attempt to understand how individual lives and social groups are shaped by social structures, cultural understandings and distributions of power. Rather than textbooks, this course will use three books as focal points of discussion (Outliers, Unequal Childhoods, and Evicted). In order to exercise our sociological imagination, the course assignments challenge the students to dissect the current events from sociological perspectives.

SOCI 001-05: Introduction to Sociology

Professor Wichkam-Crowley
TR 11:00 - 12:15 PM

The course seeks to be a general and broad-ranging introduction to the field of Sociology. We begin with the basics of the discipline itself, including the array of research methods we use in our studies and writings.  We next consider the “raw materials” of society, including the nature and numbers of humans who make up the social order.  A large portion of the term is then given over to the study of culture: the basic concepts of culture and of socialization; the culturally nurtured institutions of family and kinship, religion, economics, and politics; and then deviance and crime as violations of cultural standards. The final weeks of the course are dedicated to the study of social organization and social structure.  We begin with the micro level of face-to-face interactions and then move “upwards” to the analysis of entire societies.  Several weeks are focused on inequalities of social class, of power, and of race and gender.  We end the course considering patterns of social change (generally) and of global development (more specifically), and studies of social movements, or conscious attempts to induce sociopolitical changes.

A. Required Readings:
  Ballantine, Roberts, and Korgen, Our Social World (Condensed Version), most recent edition.
Massey, Readings for Sociology, most recent edition
Goodwin & Jasper, eds., The Contexts Reader, most recent edition
Plus many readings and handouts posted to Blackboard.

B. The Work. Three exams, each covering roughly one-third of the course, will contribute equally to your final grade.  Regardless of exam grades, I reserve the right to lower your final grade for excessive absences; see the Undergraduate Bulletin (online) for your attendance obligations.  I also reserve the right to adjust those final grades upward on the basis of strong class participation.

SOCI 001-06: Introduction to Sociology

Professor Guidroz
TR 12:30 - 1:45 PM

In this course you will learn in numerous ways that sociology is the systematic study of human society and social life.  This course is designed to be an introduction to the development of sociology, and an examination of the range of concepts, principles, and methods that comprise modern sociology using a core text and academic journal articles.  We will examine important issues and institutions of contemporary society, including culture, socialization, gender, race and ethnicity, education, family, social organization, inequality, and social change. By the semester’s end, it is anticipated that students will understand the sociological perspective and be able to discuss sociological issues using the language of the discipline.

SOCI 001-07: Introduction to Sociology

Professor Lubreski
MW 3:30 - 4:45

This course will introduce students to the discipline of sociology, the scientific study of societies and human social behavior. The primary goals of this course are for students to develop a sociological imagination in which they think critically and analytically about society and their place within it from a sociological perspective, and for students to develop an understanding about micro and macro levels of society. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and theories of sociology and be able to apply them in their daily lives.

SOCI 001-08: Introduction to Sociology

Professor Andac-Jones
TR 3:30 - 4:45 PM

Sociology is the systematic study of human social behavior.  Sociologists examine not only how social structures shape our daily interactions but also how society constructs social categories and social meanings.  The purpose of this course is to offer an overview of the major concepts, theories and methodologies of sociology, and enable students to think sociologically. Thinking sociologically enables us to make observations and offer insights about the social world that extend far beyond either common sense or explanations that rely on individual quirks and personalities; to develop an awareness of the connection between personal experience and the larger society. Throughout this course students will be introduced to “the sociological imagination” and be encouraged to develop this critical capacity to understand how the social world around you works.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to:
(a) demonstrate knowledge of basic sociological concepts, social processes (e.g., socialization, deviance, social control, or stratification) and social institutions (e.g., the family, religion, or the state);
(b) summarize several basic theoretical approaches used in sociology;
(c) apply these concepts and theories to contemporary events or personal experience, i.e. develop a sociological imagination; and demonstrate a knowledge of cultural, class, religious, and other differences within and between societies, as well as scientifically-grounded ways to account for these differences.

SOCI 111-01: Flourishing in College and Community

Professor Stiles
MW 10:00 - 10:50 AM; F 1:00 - 1:50 PM

A student culture of excellence and ambition can become counterproductive when it escalates to the extent students seriously compromise their health — mental, physical, and spiritual — in the name of grades and resume-building. National survey data show Georgetown students suffer more than their fair share of stress. This course aims to pre-empt the stress and negative sequelae, by providing incoming students with the knowledge, self-care skills, and support systems they can call on to maintain a successful and healthy lifestyle well into their post-graduate life.

This three-credit multidisciplinary course focuses on flourishing in individuals and communities. Flourishing will be considered as a public health outcome within a framework of individual well-being in college and within a campus community. Evidence-based factors that contribute to flourishing and well-being in individuals and society form the basis of this social science and health science course.

Students can expect to read scientific studies about resiliency, self-care, health promotion, health behaviors, risk taking, and positive psychology and positive sociology. Students will learn research-based correlations between stress management, life balance, and leadership. Campus climate norms around coping, stress, alcohol and sexual assault, and the prevalence of mental health issues will be analyzed. The class will consider ways to optimize health and relationships, and how to cultivate a successful lifestyle throughout college and beyond.

SOCI 111-02: Flourishing in College and Community

Professor Stiles
MW 10:00 - 10:50 AM; F 3:00 - 3:50 PM

A student culture of excellence and ambition can become counterproductive when it escalates to the extent students seriously compromise their health — mental, physical, and spiritual — in the name of grades and resume-building. National survey data show Georgetown students suffer more than their fair share of stress. This course aims to pre-empt the stress and negative sequelae, by providing incoming students with the knowledge, self-care skills, and support systems they can call on to maintain a successful and healthy lifestyle well into their post-graduate life.

This three-credit multidisciplinary course focuses on flourishing in individuals and communities. Flourishing will be considered as a public health outcome within a framework of individual well-being in college and within a campus community. Evidence-based factors that contribute to flourishing and well-being in individuals and society form the basis of this social science and health science course.

Students can expect to read scientific studies about resiliency, self-care, health promotion, health behaviors, risk taking, and positive psychology and positive sociology. Students will learn research-based correlations between stress management, life balance, and leadership. Campus climate norms around coping, stress, alcohol and sexual assault, and the prevalence of mental health issues will be analyzed. The class will consider ways to optimize health and relationships, and how to cultivate a successful lifestyle throughout college and beyond.

SOCI 125-01: Death and Dying

Professor Daddio
MW 3:30 - 4:45 PM

Death and Dying examines and analyzes from social and cultural perspectives: the definition of death; death, science and social policy; death rites and rituals; social attitudes about death; the dying process; the dying setting; suicide and euthanasia; and research concerning near death experiences.  Using an applied medical sociology approach, various social, cultural, and social psychological theories are used to explain human social behavior during dying and death social setting.

SOCI 126-01: Society & Culture: Beyonce

 

SOCI 126-02: Society & Culture: Beyonce

 

SOCI 126-03: Society & Culture: Beyonce

 

SOCI 126-04: Society & Culture: Beyonce

 

SOCI 131-01: Population Dynamics

Professor DeRose
TR 12:30 - 1:45 PM

Students enrolled in Population Dynamics will become familiar with prevailing levels of fertility, mortality, marriage, and migration in each of the world's major regions; they will also learn what processes of change resulted in current levels. In addition, the course introduces multiple issues in the complex relationship between population dynamics and economic development.

Population dynamics can be studied and understood in a variety of theoretical frameworks, but this is a sociology course and as such we consider how births, deaths, and migration interrelate with institutions in society, both public and private. Students who successfully complete this course will be competent to explain how social, economic, and cultural factors produce demographic outcomes and how demography in turn shapes society, institutions, and public policy.

SOCI 132-01: Immigrants and New Societies

Professor Cantor
R 6:30 - 9:00 PM

As one of the principal catalysts of social change in contemporary societies, immigration constitutes a uniquely fertile area of sociological inquiry. This course will provide a sociological understanding of the processes by which non-nationals move into and settle in a new country. In particular, we will examine some of the major questions that guide sociological analysis of migration: Why do people migrate? Are they allowed to migrate? How do immigration policies influence flows of migration? To what extent do newcomers become part of the mainstream society? What kind of networks do they create? What impact do they have on the receiving country? How do they relate to the native population? Do they engage in the public sphere as political subjects?  The course will primarily focus on the U.S., although we will also examine examples from other countries.

SOCI 136-01: Religion & Society

Professor Casanova
MW 11:00-12:15PM

The course will offer a comprehensive introduction to the sociology of religion. Thematically, the course will be divided into three parts. The first section will examine the two main foundations of the sociology of religion in the work of Emile Durkheim and Max Weber. The second section will offer a critical examination of the secularization debates which have raged within the sociology of religion since the 1960’s, paying special attention to the quarrels between the European and the American paradigms and looking into contemporary debates on religion and globalization. The final section will focus on sociological studies of religion in America. We will look at “private and public religions”, at debates concerning the “wall of separation” and American “civil religion,” at the transformations of Evangelical Protestantism, “the Black Church,” the historical incorporation of Catholicism and Judaism as American religions, and at the ongoing incorporation of immigrant religions from all over the world. There will be a possibility of doing ethnographic field-work and community-based research on immigrant religious congregations in Washington D.C.

SOCI 141-01: Social Innovation

Professor Cookson
MW 8:00 - 9:15 AM

Human beings are restlessly creative. In the relatively short period of 10,000 years human societies have evolved from simple hunting and gathering groups to complex global societies that include billions of people with highly diverse cultures, values and spiritual beliefs.

There have been critical inflection points or paradigm shifts in this story during which world views and civilizations were radically altered. What are the origins of these paradigm shifts? Why do some ideas and beliefs prevail and others wither? What are the social conditions that give rise to change and what is the importance in human agency in bringing about change? Why do civilizations rise and fall?

The essential premise of this course is that change is the result of social innovation.  By social innovation I mean the complex web of ideas, material advances and political arrangements that promote invention, discovery and risk taking.

The course is structured around three major inflection points in social innovation: the birth of the agricultural society, the birth of the industrial society, and the birth of the electronic society.  Each of these inflection points is treated as a case study.

The materials include classical and contemporary readings about the period under examination, studies of the aesthetic, artistic and spiritual expressions for each period, biographical case studies of each period’s “Ideal Type,” and museum field trips were some key artifacts of social innovation can be seen firsthand.

I believe that the sociological imagination is present in all of us – my goal is ignite the social imaginations of students by using cross-disciplinary materials woven together by sociological theory and reasoning and to call on the power of idealism as the fuel for lifelong learning.

SOCI 150-01: Social Intelligence in Everyday Life

Professor Hall
WF 9:30 - 10:45 AM

Social Intelligence in Everyday Life reviews and assesses the scope and potential of applied sociology. We examine the usefulness, limits, and possibilities of drawing upon the discipline of sociology to challenge common sense understandings of self and society, as well as to modify day-to-day social routines and practices. Social intelligence is the degree of awareness individuals and groups have about the complexity and predictability of diverse social forms and processes.

Sociological theories used in these analyses emphasize differences among social classes, inequalities in power relations, social institutions, social systems, and contrasting cultural styles and viewpoints. We give particular attention to the influence of increased diversity in the U.S. and the world. We also question the extent to which a learned social intelligence and collective action can ameliorate problematic social conditions and increase social justice.

Required Readings
C. Margaret Hall. 2005. Social Intelligence in Everyday Life. Coral Springs, FL: Llumina Press.
C. Wright Mills. 1959. The Sociological Imagination. New York: Oxford University Press.
Michael Schwalbe. 2005. The Sociologically Examined Life: Pieces of the Conversation. New York: McGraw Hill.

Course Grade
20% Midterm exam.
60% Class participation; reviews of required readings; reviews of additional individually-selected books and articles for research paper; research paper outline, reports, and drafts.
20% Final research paper (15 pages).

SOCI 155-01: Social Movements

Professor Andac-Jones
TR 5:00 - 6:15 PM

This course is an introduction to the sociological analysis of social movements.  Social movements have long been an important force behind political, social, and cultural change. From French Revolution to Civil Rights movement of the 60s, or the recent Arab Uprisings, they play an extraordinary role in shaping and reshaping our social institutions and everyday life.  In this course, we will aim to get a scholarly understanding of social movement theory, and learn how to apply this theoretical knowledge using a toolkit to both historical and contemporary social movements and revolutions.  We will ask most important questions regarding social movements: How do we identify social movements? When and why social movements occur? Who joins or supports movements? Who drops out? How are the movements organized? Why do they decline? What changes do they bring and how? We will pay particular attention to Civil Rights Movement, The Pro-Choice and Pro-Life Movements, American Right-Wing Movements, The LGBT Movement, Radical Islamic Movements, and Arab Uprisings, though we will also talk about many other social movements around the world.

SOCI 157-01: Global Power Elites

Professor Cookson
MW 9:30 - 10:45 AM

Global power today is exercised by an elite establishment that is networked together through institutions and interpersonal relationships. This concentration of power is hugely significant for all of us; when 85 billionaires worldwide have a much wealth as the bottom half of humanity we are experiencing a profound social and economic revolution that reverberates in all aspects of our lives.

This fact, however, should not blind us to the complex nature of power because power is never absolute but is consistently questioned and challenged by those without power and those eager for reform.

In today’s complex and fast moving social and economic global environment, power is not one directional; grassroots movement and democratic institutions are developing throughout the world, challenging the status quo and calling into question institutional arrangements that reinforce the concentration of power.

In this class, we will explore questions about the causes and consequences of concentrated power globally and resistance to it. Specially, in this course we will:

  • Examine the origins of  material and  symbolic power;
  • Identify the sources of power in the 21st century;
  • Define the meaning of elite in the context of the exercise of global power;
  • Analyze the networks that connect powerful decision-makers;
  • Describe emerging  grassroots movements and developing democratic institutions;
  • Develop theories of change that take into account the scientific, communication, economic and social revolutions sweeping the globe;
  • Advance hypotheses about the future and what they mean for the distribution of power;

 

The primary learning objectives of the course are:

  • To begin the process of understanding the centrality of power in human relations and institutions;
  • To develop a comprehensive view of how global power is gathered, exercised and challenged;
  • To become a problem-seeker and problem-solver in approaching the urgent challenges facing the global community;
  • To identify the major global power brokers today;
  • To  recognize the struggles of the non-powerful and appreciate the difficulty of challenging entrenched power;
  • To apply informed imagination to the creation of alternatives to contemporary power relations.

 

SOCI 161-01: Sociology and Gender

Professor Guidroz
MW 9:30 - 10:45 AM

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender.  Sociologists of Gender argue that gender is a major organizing principle of everyday life.  In this course will be investigating the construction and maintenance of gendered – and transgendered – identities in a gender-stratified society.  The topics we will examine include: cultural definitions and expectations regarding gender identity and roles; childhood socialization; intimacies and sexualities; gender inequalities in social institutions, including families and the economy; power and politics; and social reforms for all individuals. Variations based on the intersection of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class (as well as other “categories of experience”) are considered throughout the course.  The focus of the course is on contemporary American society as well as global and transnational issues.

SOCI 161-02: Sociology and Gender

Professor Guidroz
MW 12:30 - 1:45 PM

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender.  Sociologists of Gender argue that gender is a major organizing principle of everyday life.  In this course will be investigating the construction and maintenance of gendered – and transgendered – identities in a gender-stratified society.  The topics we will examine include: cultural definitions and expectations regarding gender identity and roles; childhood socialization; intimacies and sexualities; gender inequalities in social institutions, including families and the economy; power and politics; and social reforms for all individuals. Variations based on the intersection of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class (as well as other “categories of experience”) are considered throughout the course.  The focus of the course is on contemporary American society as well as global and transnational issues.

SOCI 168-01: CBL: Social Entrepreneurship/Change

Professor Stiles
TR 3:30 - 4:45 PM; W 2:00 - 4:30 PM

This course aims to expose the students to fresh concepts in social change and provide the student with the opportunity to work with a community partner on a socially entrepreneurial project.

People have different opinions on how to define “social entrepreneurship.” When one thinks of the word “entrepreneur” most likely the image of a successful business person comes to mind. While the business entrepreneur’s bottom line is profit, i.e., (financial) capital, we could say the social entrepreneur’s bottom line is social capital, or public value. The social entrepreneur matches new combinations of people and resources to achieve social justice and a higher quality of life for all involved.

The course has three basic parts, reading and discussing the literature (Tuesdays); meeting practitioners and members of the community, and doing thought provoking workshops designed by Echoing Green (Thursdays); and the “community-based learning” (CBL) component working in the field with community partners (Wednesdays and on your own).

Each student will be part of a small group that will partner with a community-based or faith-based social enterprise on a project to further the organization's mission. Students are required to spend approximately 40 hours with their community partner over the course of the semester.

SOCI 190-01: Black Writers on White Identity

Professor Dyson
M 2:00 - 4:30 PM

This course will examine the nature of white identity through a black lens, probing ideas about white privilege, white innocence, and white fragility. We will probe the historical, cultural, racial and religious features of white culture and behavior as they impinge on, and are interpreted by, black writers, thinkers, artists and filmmakers.

SOCI 195-01: Social Terrorism

Professor Daddio
MW 5:00 - 6:15 PM

Sociology of Terrorism takes a deviance and social control approach to the concept, theories, structure, and control of terrorism.  A concept of many meanings and applications, the first section of the course will examine the social construct of the concept, terrorism, from several social and cultural perspectives. The second component of the course will examine terrorism from the  functional/structural, conflict, and symbolic interaction theories of sociology. The first is the theoretical approach normally applied by governments, the second is the classic argument used by terrorist groups, while the third theory focuses on the protagonists and the victims.  Part three will focus on the current state of terrorism, and part four on the current debate about controlling terrorism.  The method is lecture participation, and discussion.  The last section will present expected future trends in terrorism.

SOCI 201-01: Methods of Social Research

Professor Hinkson
TR 11:00 - 12:15 PM

This course covers the fundamentals of social science research design. Great emphasis is placed on principles that are applicable to all methods of research, from surveys to participant observation, from comparative historical to statistical analysis. Starting with an introduction to the philosophy of science, the course moves on to such practical matters as how to distinguish a theory from a philosophical assertion or political program; how to frame a research question; how to design a research project to test a hypothesis; how to conduct research; and how to write a research proposal.

SOCI 202-01: Sociological Theory

Professor Hsu
MW 12:30 - 1:45 PM

This course examines major theories of society exemplified in the work of sociological theorists. We will give special emphasis and about half of the term to those classical theorists whose insights formed the foundation of contemporary sociology: Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Émile Durkheim. In the latter part of the course we will survey and "map out" a variety of contemporary perspectives on society--most are heavily indebted to those three classical roots--including symbolic interactionism and its variants, structural-functionalism, conflict and exchange theories, neo-Marxisms and critical theory, feminism, and varied approaches to culture. In addition, we will give some attention to the social and organizational contexts in which classical and contemporary theory have emerged.

The writing for the course will consist of a series of short writing assignments, numbering eleven in all. You may skip three (3) of these; thus you will have to write eight (8) of these in all, together contributing 80% of your final grade. Each assignment will be either (1) a short essay (ca. 3 pages) or (2) a series of roughly paragraph-length answers to a series of questions I pose to you.

Required Bookstore Texts: Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader, 2d ed. only; From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology, eds. Gerth & Mills. Émile Durkheim, Suicide: A Study in Sociology; Peter Kivisto, Social Theory: Roots and Branches Readings, 4th ed. only (2011). Plus many Blackboard readings.

SOCI 203-01: Social Statistics

Professor McDonald
TR 9:30 - 10:45 AM

This is an introduction to statistical analysis of social data. It presumes no math knowledge beyond high school algebra and no more than basic computer literacy. It is intended for the beginning social researcher. It introduces the logic of statistical reasoning and all of the basic statistical measures used in elementary analysis of social data. Students who have not had any sociology courses must get the permission of the instructor for admission to this course.

The course includes the following topics: various methods of summarizing, presenting and comparing descriptive data graphically and in summary measures of central tendency and of variation; the normal distribution and probability theory; methods of examining the strength and significance of relationships among variables; hypothesis testing; chi-square; analysis of variance; multi-variate tabular analysis; and multiple regression and correlation.

Students perform statistical analyses of real data sets (including the General Social Survey, the premier database for social scientists) with a user-friendly PC-based statistical package (an individual copy of which comes with each textbook). (Mac-version not available.) Homework problems are due about once every week and a half.

By the end of the course the student should develop the ability to:

  • use measures of central tendency and of variation
  • interpret measures of association
  • create and interpret multivariate tables
  • understand the meaning and application of certain statistical tests: chi square, one-way ANOVA; multivariate correlation and regression
  • understand the logic of hypothesis testing

 

SOCI 220-01: Global Development and Social Justice

Professor Hsu
MW 3:30 - 4:45 PM

Global development is a term that refers to efforts around the world to make societies better (by improving people’s lives), especially for people who have lower income and less access to important things such as education and health services. This course explores the efforts being made to alleviate the suffering of people around the globe. Some of the questions we will answer include: What are people doing to try to help people around the world? Are those efforts effective? Why or why not? What are some of the unintended consequences that occur as a result of these activities?

Out of the uneasy mix of missionaries, conquistadors, colonists, and humanitarians who populate its prehistory, poverty alleviation (in conjunction with the exercise of power) has evolved in the past six decades to become the field of global development as we know it today. Its dominant institutions became nationally and formally organized after World War II awakened the American conscience in a new way to the suffering of people in far-flung parts of the world, while at the same time, powerful national interests shaped the development enterprise more broadly. The goals of poverty alleviation have been realized to some extent; standards of living have risen to unprecedented levels since the 1990s. However, there are also apprehensions that global development is failing in some important ways. Some critics within the industry wonder how much people are really benefiting.

This course is organized in roughly three sections: First, we examine research on what development interventions look like on the ground. What do people do, and how do people respond? How effective are the programs and projects? What are the outcomes?

In the second section, we examine various explanations for why we are seeing particular outcomes, including those that focus on development’s historical roots, global political and economic structures, and organizational logics.

Finally, the last section will look at various answers to the question, “How, then, should we proceed with global development?” A core part of one’s answer to this question depends on the definition of well-being one assumes. We will examine what “development as freedom” implies, as well as other conceptions of the good life and the use of happiness indexes around the world.

The learning objectives of this course are:

  • To understand global development from perspective of the person the programs are intended to help
  • To think critically about global development interventions
  • To learn about the ways that people are trying to measure and improve human well-being around the world

SOCI 223-01: Public Housing: Theory/Practice

Professor McCabe
M 6:30 - 9:00 PM

While the term ‘public housing’ still conjures up images of high-rise developments, most Americans living in publicly funded housing units do not live in these complexes. In fact, public housing refers to a broad set of initiatives to create safe, affordable housing opportunities for low-income Americans. Many of these policies emerged as a response to the perceived failures of large-scale public housing in the mid-twentieth century. This course examines the multiple types of policies designed to provide housing assistance in the United States. To do so, it interrogates the relationship between theory and practice – namely, how disciplines throughout the social sciences, including economics, sociology, architecture and urban planning, have informed the assumptions made by policymakers in their pursuit of better housing policies. After tracing the history of large-scale public housing developments, we will focus on several newer initiatives, including housing vouchers and the creation of mixed-income communities, that attempt to de-concentrate poverty and create opportunities for poor Americans.

SOCI 224-01: Family Diversity in America

Professor Reid
W 6:30 - 9:00 PM

In this course, students will learn about the family as a social institution. Course materials will specifically focus on US families in all their diversity and students will apply a critical sociological perspective to analyzing the role of families in social life. Students will learn about the historical roots of the family, changing demographic trends in family composition and family formation, and family-related social problems and social policies. Specific topics include family of origin and socialization, sex and dating, partnering and marriage, parenting, family structure, gender and family, and work/family balance.  Throughout the course students will develop critical understanding of the relationship between the family and social inequalities pertaining to class, race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation.

Course Materials:
Textbook:
Ferguson, Susan J. (2011). Shifting The Center: Understanding Contemporary Families. (4th Ed.) New York: McGraw Hill
Other Excerpted Readings:
Coontz, Stephanie.(2005). Marriage, a history: From obedience to intimacy, or how love conquered marriage. New York: Viking.
DeLuca, Stefanie. Clampet-Lundquist, Susan, & Edin, Kathryn. (2016). Coming of Age in the Other America. New York: Russell Sage.>br /> Edin, Kathy & Kefalas, Maria. (2004) Promises I Can Keep. Berkeley: UC Press.
Gonzales, Roberto G. (2015). Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and coming of age in America. Berkeley: UC Press.
Stacey, Judith. (2011). Unhitched: Love, sex, and family values from West Hollywood to western China. NYU Press.
Moore, Mignon. (2011). Invisible families: Gay identities, relationships, and motherhood among Black women. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Lareau, Annett (2011, second edition) Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life. UC Press
Journal of Marriage and Family decade in review articles

SOCI 226-01: Consumerism/East Asian Societies

Professor McNamara
MW 9:30 - 10:45 AM

What can you say about consumption? Some lament that it forces conformity to trends, others rejoice in the freedom to choose. Economists contend that consumption spurs growth, employment, and material welfare. Others counter that it fosters selfishness, waste and environmental degradation. Seems ironic that we all agree work is good, but not so consumption or even worse, consumerism. We seem to tolerate "over-working," but broadly condemn "over-consuming."

Consumerism is the study of a way of life. It takes us beyond consumption or questions of what we purchase or how much we spend, to more fundamental issues of how and why we consume. Probing a range of attitudes, conflicting values and unequal access, the study raises issues of equality, distribution, and social justice.

Both Korea and China stand apart from the Western experience of consumption in the pace of change, unease with consumer individualism and modernity, and the extensive role of the state. Lianne Yu offers a broad survey of consumption and social change in China’s rapidly developing economy, whether status, lifestyle or identities. John Lee looks rather in depth to one major stream in Korean consumerism, K-Pop. Both scholars engage major concepts providing an analytic map for the course: reflexivity (Giddens), cultural capital (Bourdieu), commodification (Marx), and enchantment (Weber).

Two examinations will insure a common ground of theory and case material across the members of the class, as well as an 8-10 page paper. You will learn much of your own consumer attitudes, and of the stores or corporations, the media, and the reference groups that shape your taste. You will better understand Asian consumer identities, and the role of markets and states in shaping their lifestyles. Equally important are the concepts drawn from the course, useful for unpacking the complexity of your own consumerism, that of your society, and of the rapidly evolving patterns in Asia.

Course Texts:
Lie, John. K-Pop: Popular Music, Cultural Amnesia, and Economic Innovation in South Korea. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2014.
Ritzer, George. Enchanting a Disenchanted World. Third Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press, 2009.
Wherry, Frederick F. The Culture of Markets. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2012.
Yu, Lianne. Consumption in China. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2014.

SOCI 240-01: Poverty/Inequality in America

Professor Owens
T 6:30 - 9:00 PM

This course will examine the science of poverty and inequality. We'll cover the major empirical debates on the causes and consequences of poverty and inequality. We'll look at what the social scientific literature can tell us about how inequality shapes life chances, neighborhoods, political institutions, and health, among other outcomes.  We'll look at several dimensions of inequality, including race, class, income, education, and gender and we'll cover multiple methodological approaches to the study of inequality, including quantitative, experimental, and ethnographic methods.  Students will leave the course with a comprehensive survey of the literature in the field, and a better understanding, grounded in science, of why increasing income inequality is one of the most pressing social issues of our time.

SOCI 249-01: Family & Gender in Japan

Professor Imamura
W 3:30 - 6:00 PM

Family and Gender issues are central concerns in Japanese debates about domestic policy, values and the nation’s ability to develop in the 21st century. This course will move between historical and contemporary definitions of family and gender to introduce the student to institutional structures and ideas of change in contemporary Japan. While focusing on Japan, the course will incorporate theses of gender East and West with the goal of identifying ideas and institutions which can serve as touchstones for a better understanding of Japanese society, and for a reflexive comparison with the US and other societies.

Course Requirements
- Two exams and one research paper
- A journal
- Participation in two discussion groups and serve as leader for one discussion group.
- Post to class blogs.
- The previous semester’s syllabus is posted on the Registrar’s website and provides general information.

SOCI 257-01: Brazilian Society

Professor Wichkam-Crowley
TR 2:00 - 3:15 PM

A. The Course

This course is intended to provide a general, sociological approach to the cultural and social structures of contemporary Brazil.  Brazil merits special sociological study since it is (by far) the largest “Catholic” nation in the world.  Its population (5th largest on earth) exhibits a very rich regional and ethnic diversity, the latter encompassing various European, African, indigenous, and Asian peoples.  It is also the largest speaking any of the Romance languages (here Portuguese).  Its income and wealth distributions reach (or nearly so) the very highest levels of inequality found in the world, including huge disparities among the racial groups.  And it has one of the largest economies in the world.

We will consider Brazil via a large number of issues and topics familiar to anyone who has taken an introductory sociology course, but obviously with a different national focus.  After initial brief coverage of Brazil’s  geography and  history, we will consider the following Brazilian topics: population and patterns of demographic change, including family planning; cultural institutions such as the family (with attention to norms and ethnic intermarriage patterns), religions (including the African-derived and the Protestant), the economy (including foreign influences and recent restructuring), politics (including recent democratization and related matters); education and its inequalities; the mass media; sports; cultural norms and values, and deviance from those norms; patterns of crime and of criminal justice.   In considering social organization, we will consider patterns of face-to-face social relationships (including networks and clientelism) and of regional and urban-rural residence, after which we will closely study several different patterns of inequality, with a good deal of attention to social class and mobility, to gender, and to racial & ethnic relations.  Finally we will consider Brazilian movements for social and political change.

Course Prerequisite: Introduction to Sociology or Anthropology or a course in Latin American History or permission of the instructor.

B. Coursework and Grading

Undergraduate Students. Three-fourths of your final grade for the course will derive from your grades on two equally weighted exams which, since so few in number, will be correspondingly rigorous and challenging.  The remaining one-fourth of your grade will be based on class attendance and participation (noting that the latter requires the former).  Just to encourage you to participate regularly, smartly, and volubly, know that every student begins this term with a participation grade of “F”; it is therefore your individual responsibility to raise that assessment during the course of the term.  Part of the participation grade will be based upon in-class presentations, whether done individually or collectively.

Graduate Students from Latin American Studies. The components of your grade will vary somewhat: one-half from the two exams, one-quarter from class participation, and one-quarter from a 10-15 page research paper you will hand in on the very last class-meeting day of the term.

C. Possible Required Books
Edmonds: Alexander Edmonds, Pretty Modern: Beauty, Sex, and Plastic Surgery in Brazil;
Holston: James Holston, Insurgent Citizenship;
Lever: Janet Lever, Soccer Madness;
Page: Joseph Page, The Brazilians;
Perlman: Janice Perlman, Favela: Four Decades of Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro;
Telles: Edward Telles, Race in Another America.
The following title is completely accessible via JSTOR:
Daedalus: Special issue of Daedalus (vol. 129, no. 2): “Brazil: The Burden of the Past; the Promise of the Future” (Spring 2000).

SOCI 274-01: Environ/Food Justice Movements

Professor Kato
R 12:30 - 3:00 PM

This seminar draws on a range of interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives in examining the similarities and differences between the environmental justice movement (EJM) and the food justice movement (FJM). EJM has a slightly longer history in the United States than FJM, and the two movements share notable similarities but with some key differences in terms of in terms of how they define and aim to resolve the problems of environmental injustice or food injustice. We begin by situating the emergence of EJM and FJM in the context of broader environmental and alternative food movements, both domestically and globally, and explore how various theoretical frameworks of the movements analyze environmental and food issues through the lens of social justice and human inequality, specifically on categories of race, class, and more recently, gender. Over the course of the semester we will examine various real cases of environmental and food justice activism, including both successful and failed attempts, and discuss each case in relation to the theoretical frameworks introduced in the seminar through the assigned readings and the lecture.

UNXD 130 CBL: Social Action is a 1-credit course through Georgetown University's Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching, and Service (CSJ) in which students actively integrate academic studies with community engagement work through critical reflection. Due to the focus of the course there will be a high compatibility with this option, and the instructor will have a list of recommended organizations to partner with at the beginning of the semester. There are multiple opportunities to engage the service component of the CBL course into this seminar. To register for UNXD 130, identify your course and community placement and complete a registration form online no later than Friday, September 8. Visit csj.georgetown.edu/unxd130 and email csjcbl@georgetown.edu for more information.